A Danish management engineering student with a mechanical background, language freak, runner, boxer, football fan, Latin music lover, world traveler and passionately curious.

 

Rediscovering Buenos Aires

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This is the second out of two posts about my experiences in Argentina, the first is Argentina and its impact.

¿Por qué volviste, Andreas?" (Why did you come back, Andreas?) - a professor asks me outside of the auditorium right after class.

The question was extremely simple and I had answered such question about my many returns to Argentina a lot of times. My usual answer would be “la carne argentina" (Argentine meat) along with a cheeky smile leaving interpretation to the listener, which usually produces a great laugh - in other words, I’d answer with a joke. But something was different this time, I had eight Argentine engineering professors standing in front of me with great expectations of my answer. They were all impressed with my Argentine Spanish skills and it was obvious they were looking for something out of the common, a side of Argentina only a foreigner from far away with great local knowledge can detect. Why is the country worth travelling back to continuously from the other side of the planet, when any other location could have been chosen for exchange in my mechanical engineering degree?

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Argentina and its impact

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Anybody who’s ever had even a brief conversation with me has noticed Argentina popping in somehow, somewhere along. Since I traveled there first in 2008, this place has not only been my second home, but a great passion, too.

Why Argentina has had such an impact on me has a few explanations. First of all, this was the first time I had left my home continent, Europe, and the first time I did a long independent travel after high school. In other words, it had a sort of “first-time-impact” you just don’t get again after years of travelling the world. Then there’s the fact that the country profile matched what I love: world class football, big steaks and the language I had learned through high school, Spanish. Plus, the cheap prices didn’t make things worse.

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Froch vs. Kessler II: The Viking War of England

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The following article was published on the 22nd of May at BoxingNews24.com.

By Andreas Strøjer Tynan Schmidt: In 1013, the Danish Vikings and the Englishmen settled a battle that had been going on for years and eventually ended in the capital of England, London. The Danish Vikings were led by a strong and brutal Viking warrior, King Sweyn Forkbeard, who ironically had English blood running through his veins.

Now, exactly one thousand years later, another great battle will take place this Saturday in the same city, as IBF super middleweight champion Carl Froch (30-2, 22 KO’s) takes on WBA super middleweight champion Mikkel Kessler (46-2, 35 KO’s) in a highly anticipated boxing rematch. An Englishmen receiving a Dane that calls himself the Viking Warrior, who, as Sweyn Forkbeard, is part English himself. The similarities are many. Both men have similar stories coming up to this fight, having fought weaker opposition the last couple of years since losses and injuries broke their earlier rhythms. Both men are also walking in the shadow of the super middleweight king, Andre Ward, and have each lost twice to the best opposition they could find in the division. There can be no doubt whether these two men are the very best of the weight class just after Ward. So where do they differentiate?

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(Source: boxingnews24.com)